Election Slate for November 8, 2016

Each election I prepare a slate card for my friends so we can debate how to vote here in San Francisco (and beyond). Thanks to Edward and Ruth for their ballot reading brunch. Here’s what I have so far… I’d love your input (I’ll post comments people submit to me below)–

Elected Offices

U.S. President: Hillary Clinton (if you’re in a battleground state, please vote lesser-of-evils Clinton, rather than Green or Libertarian or whatever, to inflict the least suffering on the largest number of humans and our planet)

U.S. Vice President: Tim Kaine

U.S. Senator: Kamala Harris

U.S. Representative: Picus, a Bernie Democrat running as an independent, as protest against Pelosi (thanks to Edward for changing my mind on this one)

California State Senator: Jane Kim (don’t even get me started on Wiener)

California State Assemblymember: David Chiu

Judge of the Superior Court, Office No. 7: Victor Hwang

San Francisco Board of Education (up to four):

Stevon Cook
Matt Haney
Mark Sanchez
Rachel Norton

San Francisco Community College Board (up to four):

Shanell Williams
Tom Temprano
Alex Randolph
(I can’t bring myself to vote for Rafael Mandelman due to his collaboration with the forces taking over City College and the other candidate is worse)

BART Director District 9: Bevan Dufty

San Francisco Board of Supervisors District 1: Sandra Lee Fewer (crucial to keeping a progressive majority, thanks Gabriel!)

San Francisco Board of Supervisors District 3: Aaron Peskin

San Francisco Board of Supervisors District 5: Dean Preston

San Francisco Board of Supervisors District 7: Norman Yee

San Francisco Board of Supervisors District 9: Hilary Ronen (you have three choices for ranked voting, but the others aren’t worthy of a ranking in my opinion)

San Francisco Board of Supervisors District 11: Kimberly Alveranga (crucial to keeping a progressive majority, thanks Gabriel!)

California Propositions

51: No (especially because of the $500 million in charter school funding)
52: Yes
53: No
54: Yes
55: Yes
56: Yes
57: Yes
58: Yes
59: Yes (finally made it to the ballot this year)
60: No (does nothing to increase safer sex while anyone could sue adult film industry)
61: No (may result in increased drug prices and red tape delays)
62: Yes (abolish the death penalty! although the forced labor section is suboptimal)
63: Yes
64: Yes (legalize it!)
65: No
66: No
67: Yes

Regional Proposition

RR: Yes

San Francisco Propositions

A: Yes
B: Yes
C: Yes
D: Yes
E: Yes
F: Yes
G: Yes
H: Yes
I: Yes
J: Yes
K: Yes
L: Yes
M: Yes
N: Yes
O: No (proponents still haven’t built housing promised with prior proposition)
P: No (city forced to reject good bid if three bids not received)
Q: No
R: No
S: Yes
T: Yes
U: No (misleadingly named trick by developers)
V: Yes
W: Yes
X: Yes
——

Election Slate for June 7, 2016

Each year I prepare a slate card for my friends so we can debate how to vote here in San Francisco (and beyond). Here’s what I have so far… I’d love your input (I’ll post comments people submit to me below)–

U.S. President: Bernie Sanders

U.S. Senate: Kamala Harris

State Senate District 11: Jane Kim

Superior Court Judge office no. 7: Victor Hwang

Democratic County Central Committee (17th AD):

The Reform Slate is Alysabeth Alexander, Tom Ammiano, David Campos, Petra DeJesus, Bevan Dufty, Jon Golinger, Pratima Gupta, Frances Hsieh, Jane Kim, Sophie Maxwell, Aaron Peskin, Leroy Wade Woods, Cindy Wu

{Note: Upon further reflection, and thanks to my friend Harry and the AFT 2121, I’ve decided not to vote for Rafael Mandelman due to his long record of poor decision making on the City College of San Francisco Board of Trustees.}

California Proposition

50: Yes

Regional Proposition

AA: Yes {Folks at the Bay Guardian disapprove of this proposition due to the precedent it sets for creation of a tax for a regional authority that is not very democratically administered.}

San Francisco Propositions

Proposition A: Yes

Proposition B: No

Proposition C: Yes

Proposition D: Yes

Proposition E: Yes

Election Slate for November 3, 2015

Each year I prepare a slate card for my friends so we can debate how to vote here in San Francisco (and beyond). Here’s what I have so far… I’d love your input (I’ll post comments people submit to me below)–

San Francisco Offices

Board of Supervisors, District 3: Aaron Peskin
(most important race on the ballot, please vote if you’re in this district!)

Mayor: NOT Ed Lee (rank 1: Francisco Herrera, rank 2: Amy Farah Weiss)

Sheriff: Ross Mirkarimi (rank 1)

City Attorney: Dennis Herrera (only candidate)

District Attorney: George Gascon (only candidate)

Treasurer: Jose Cisneros (only candidate)

Community College Board: Wendy Aragon

San Francisco Propositions

Proposition A: Yes (affordable housing)

Proposition B: Yes (city employee parental leave)

Proposition C: No (remove grassroots organization requirement)

Proposition D: Yes (good compromise with commitment to 40% affordable housing, more than any other private project in SF history)

Proposition E: Yes (broadcast city meetings on Internet, permit comment by Internet)

Proposition F: Yes (regulate short-term rentals to protect SF rental housing stock)

Proposition G: No (even PGE doesn’t want this anymore)

Proposition H: Yes (local clean energy whenever possible)

Proposition I: Yes (temporarily halt non-affordable-housing development projects to create housing stabilization plan for the Mission)

Proposition J: Yes (preserve legacy businesses and non-profits)

Proposition K: Yes (expands affordable housing)

Learning From the Politics of the Left in Spain


“Felipe Gil and Francisco Jurado, in Winning by Overflowing [in Spanish], laid out this new reality that defied the conventional wisdom of the political spin doctors, campaign consultants and party machines. In their article, they speak of inconclusive and unfinished narratives, of open prototypes and mutant identities. And they single out the key for all the political confluences that emerged and would emerge: ‘to let oneself trust and be invaded by an uncontrolled collective construction.’ Mayo Fuster, a researcher in collaborative culture, also highlighted this point: ‘The key concept here is overflow, which refers to the capacity to loose control over a process and to operate freely during the process of mobilization.’

More at Occupy Article Part I and Occupy Article Part II