More National Museum in Addis Ababa

Continuing on from the previous blog entry, the National Museum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, has some other impressive modern pieces, such as this statue called “Hair Style”, the painting “Genital Mutilation” by Abebe Zelelew (2003), and “Fetel” by Marta Mengistu (2004).

Hair Style Status, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Genital Mutilation Painting by Abebe Zelelew (2003), National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Fetel by Marta Mengistu (2004), National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

“Bedebo Fetel” is by an unknown artist.

Bedebo Fetel by Unknown Artist, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

On the ground floor of the museum is also a section on other historical periods of Ethiopia (and now Eritrea). Many items I am not able to identify because they were not labeled well, such as these pictures of Ethiopian tribal people.

Photo of Ethiopian Tribe Members, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Photo of Ethiopian Tribal People, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Some are musical instruments like the secular krar and its liturgical counterpart.

Krar, Secular Ethiopian Instrument, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Eccessiastical String Instrument, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

How about an Ethiopian game?

Ethiopian Game, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Photo of Ethiopians Playing Game, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

I loved these brilliantly carved artifacts, the latter one being a limestone seat niche decorated with a relief of persons and an ibex from the 5th to 4th century BCE in Haoulti, Tigrai, Ethiopia.

Carved Seated Woman, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Limestone Seat Niche With Relief of Persons and Ibex (5th-4th century BCE) in Haoulti, Tigrai, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Then, from the second half of the first millenium BCE in Hawlti, Tigrai, Ethiopia, we have two red earthenware female figurines and a group of buff earthenware human figurines.

Two Red Earthenware Female Figures, 2nd Half of 1st Millenium BCE, Hawlti, Tigrai, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Buff Earthenware Figurines From 2nd Half of 1st Millenium BCE in Hawlti, Tigrai, Now Located at National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

From the second century BCE to the second century CE in Kuhi, Tigrai, comes a buff earthenware tripod pod with “human legs”.

Buff Earthenware Tripod Pot From 2nd century BCE to 2nd century CE in Kuhi, Tigrai, Now Located at National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

From the fifth to fourth century BCE in Goboshela or Gobochela, Tigrai, comes a limestone and alabaster altar with an inscription in “South Arabic” about a family’s dedication to their god “for the protection of their life” and a stone incense burner from the sixth to fifth century BCE in the same region with the inscription “Ylbb the stone worker has dedicated to Almaqah”.
Limestone and Alabaster Altar From 5th-4th Century BCE in Goboshela, Tigrai, Now Located at National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Stone Incense Burner With Inscription From 6th-5th Century BCE in Gobochela, Tigrai, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
From the end of the first millenium BCE in Addi-Galamo, Tigrai, a small alabaster altar and, from the sixth to fifth century BCE in the same region, a limestone statue of a female with the inscription in “South Arabian” (looks like a different language to me) of “For god grants a child to Yamanat.”

Small Alabaster Altar From End of 1st Millenium BCE in Addi-Galamo, Tigrai, Now Located at National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Limestone Statue of Female With Childbirth Inscription, 6th-5th Century BCE, in Addi-Galamo, Tigrai, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Then, we see an bronze oil lamp depicting a dog hunting an ibex from before the first century BCE in Matara, now part of Eritrea.

Bronze Oil Lamp Depicting Dog Hunting Ibex, Before 1st Century BCE, Matara, Eritrea, Now Located at National Museum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

The collection also holds some exquisite female figurines from Matara that look similar to the really ancient Anatolian mother goddess figures, two in terra cotta and one in white stone, date information unfortunately not listed.

Terra Cotta Female Figurine From Matara, Ethiopia, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Terra Cotta Female Figurine From Matara, Ethiopia, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia White Stone Female Figurine From Matara, Eritrea, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Here’s an exquisite amphora used to import wine and olive oil from the Mediterranean to Axum, Tigrai, in the fourth to seventh century CE.

Amphora to Import Olive Oil to Axum, Tigrai, in 4th-7th Century CE, Now Located in National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Photo of unidentified anthropomorphic stela from Southern Ethiopia.

Photo of Unidentified Anthropomorphic Stela from Southern Ethiopia, National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Finally, when I left the museum, I wandered around the grounds and came across this cafe in a traditional building called a tukul.

Exterior View of Tukul Cafe Near National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Interior View of Tukul Cafe Near National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Woven Ceiling of Tukul Cafe Near National Museum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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